News from the Inland Empire

The House That Hubbell Built

NW

Hubbell’s Career

Clarence Hubbell came to Spokane at 31 years old.  He had left Illinois and his family screen making business.  While attending the Art Institute in Chicago, he had worked extra hours in an architect’s office.

When he arrived in the...

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Two Young Men Risk All

NW

Charles Kemp was a poor Michigan lad who drifted west.  He sold Ann Arbor newspapers and moved out west to become a cowboy in the Black Hills.  As he relocated in various towns,he drifted into Spokane in 1893.  When he arrived...

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First School on North Side of River

NW

Four Years Old Anniversary of Spokane Falls

In 1882 there were only two public schools in the Village, both on the south side of the river.  There was also a problem with funding because laws setting out how to assess taxes...

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City Gets New Downtown Shopping Area

NW

When the Downtown Retail Corridor Shifted 90 degrees

Dan Corbin owned a lot on the northwest corner of Main Avenue and Washington Street.

The lot had 120 feet on Main Avenue and 142 feet on Washington Street.  On June 6th, 1907 Dan Corbin was willing...

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The Telephone Arrives in Spokane

NW

In 1881, with the arrival of railroads, telegraph lines were strung along their tracks - connecting many towns with telegraph.

Nothing much changed for the next 5 years.   Telegrams were extremely expensive.  They charged rates of 10 cents a word and more.

 

Telephones started...

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Building the Railroad

SE

There were two men the Northern Pacific heavily relied upon to get track laid - Peter Larsen and Tom Greenough.   Peter Larsen lived in Helena and was 24 years old when he started railroad contracting.  Tom Greenough lived in Missoula...

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The new city limits Announced

NW

City Almost Doubles In Size

March 1, 1890  

The city council met last night to consider extending the city limits.  The plan is to make it three and a half miles square.  A few councilmen wanted it expanded to four miles...

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Spirit Lake’s First Settler

NW

Peter Rhodebeck died in May, 1914 sitting on his cabin porch gazing at the wonderous scene of nature.  He was 70 years old and in good health.

Peter was the first person to live permanently in the deep wilderness at Spirit...

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